You are at risk of litigation if you cannot demonstrate adequate systems and procedures in place to protect your business, your customers, your employees and your suppliers.  Fieldfisher is one of a small number of law firms with a dedicated cyber and data disputes practice.

Following a serious data security breach, the impact can stretch far beyond reputational damage and immediate financial loss. Liability for a breach can affect a business which does not maintain its systems adequately, fails to apply appropriate security measures or otherwise fails to prevent a breach which is foreseeable. Companies which neglect their duty of care face a range of litigation risks including liability claims from individuals, customers and business partners.

As the number of cyber security incidents increases dramatically, so does the scope for ensuing disputes and litigation. Resolving disputes can be complex and protracted. Our team helps clients simplify the process and keep proceedings to a minimum. We advise a large number of national and multinational clients in dispute resolution after a data breach: instructions are often pan-European, and in many cases, global.

Companies increasingly turn to specialised cyber insurance in order to mitigate their risk, but this is not always effective, particularly if there has been a compliance failure. The advent of GDPR further adds to the burden of greater transparency and accountability from companies by giving greater privacy protection for individuals.

A number of the cases we undertake on behalf of clients are highly specialised in nature, reflecting our broader contentious practice which extends well beyond straightforward litigation. Our experience in advising on intricate, often cross-border disputes means that if your business faces potentially difficult litigation then we have probably seen it before - and know how to proceed in your best interest.

Having a team of dispute resolution lawyers on call should be an essential element of your cyber security strategy.  Contact James Seadon.