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Insight

Implied consent getting ever closer in the Netherlands

Phil Lee
25/05/2013
On 20 May 2013, Dutch Minister Kamp (Minister for Economic Affairs) presented a bill to amend Article 11.7a of the Dutch Telecommunications Act (‘the cookie law’). Once it passes into law the bill On 20 May 2013, Dutch Minister Kamp (Minister for Economic Affairs) presented a bill to amend Article 11.7a of the Dutch Telecommunications Act (‘the cookie law’). Once it passes into law the bill will, among other things, allow website operators to rely on visitors’ implied consent to serve cookies and will also exempt analytics cookies from the consent requirement.

Why these changes are needed

In February this year the Dutch government concluded that the cookie law had overshot its intended objective. The current cookie law require website owners to obtain visitors’ opt-in consent to virtually all types of cookies, except those which are strictly necessary. This led to widespread adoption of opt-in consent barriers and pop-up screens which, the Government accepts, is undesirable from both a consumer and business standpoint.

The Government believes the problem with the current law is that it applies equally to all cookies, even those with little privacy impact. Because of this, it proposes that the scope of the consent exemptions should expand to include more types of cookies.

New exemptions: analytics cookies, affiliate cookies and a/b-testing cookies

Currently, a website operator does not have to obtain consent if cookies are strictly necessary to provide a visitor-requested service. Once the bill enters into effect, a further category of cookies will be exempted from the consent requirement – those which are “absolutely necessary […] to obtain information about the quality and effectiveness of an information society service provided  – provided that this has no or little consequences for the privacy of the user.

First-party and third-party analytics cookies, affiliate referral cookies and a/b testing cookies all seem likely to fall within the scope of this new exemption.  However, to ensure that these cookies qualify as having “no or little consequences for the privacy of the user”:

  • the data collected by these cookies must not be used to make a profile of the visitor (e.g. for targeting purposes); and



  • if the website operator shares cookie data with a third party (e.g. an analytics service provider), it must conclude an agreement with the third party that either requires the third party not to use the data for its own purposes or, alternatively, only for defined purposes that have no or little effect on visitors' privacy.


Implied Consent

For other types of cookies (in particular, targeted advertising cookies), the consent requirements of the cookie law apply in full.  However, the explanatory memorandum to the bill discusses the interpretation of ‘consent’ in great detail and advocates the legal validity of implied consent solutions.

In particular, it advocates that implied consent may be legally derived from the behavior of the visitor of a website - for example, in the case where a visitor is presented with a clear notice about the website’s use of cookies and given options to control those cookies but continues to browse the website.  This is at odds with previous regulatory opinions of the ACM (formerly the OPTA, the relevant regulator for these purposes) which said that implied consent would not constitute valid consent.

Although Dutch recognition of implied consent has been anticipated for a while (see here), this is a critical development for online businesses in the Netherlands.  Once the bill enters into force, website operators will be able to replace their current explicit consent barriers and pop-ups with more user-friendly implied consent banners indicating that continued use of the website without changing cookie settings will constitute consent.

All in all, the bill is a major step towards a more pragmatic implementation of the cookie law. With these changes, Dutch law will better balance the privacy interests of website visitors with online businesses’ legitimate data collection activities.

When will the bill enter into force?

The bill is open for public consultation until 1 July 2013, and the Minister must also consult the Council of State and the Dutch Data Protection Authority. On the basis of the consultation responses, the minister may then decide to amend the bill or submit it to Parliament as currently drafted. Parliamentary discussion can be completed within a few months, but may potentially take up to a year. However, given the current momentum behind adopting a more pragmatic cookie regime in the Netherlands, it is anticipated that the overall process will be toward the shorter end of this timescale.

With thanks to our friends Nicole Wolters Ruckert and Maarten Goudsmit, Privacy Attorneys at Kennedy Van der Laan, for this update. 

 

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